News Release 

Estrogen status - not sex - protects against heightened fear recall

Brain oscillatory activity provides readout

Elsevier

Research News

Philadelphia, April 15, 2021 - A new study shows that markers of fear recall differ between men and women, but in a hormone-dependent manner.

Aberrant fear-memory processing in the brain is thought to underlie anxiety disorders, which affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these disorders remain poorly understood, but recent studies suggest that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex can reflect the strength of fear recall activity, providing a physiological measure.

Women suffer from anxiety disorders at twice the rate of men and indeed the literature shows that there are sex differences in fear recall behaviors, but this area of study has not been extended to neural oscillations. Additional studies suggest a modulatory role for the female sex hormone estradiol (E2) for fear recall and extinction recall.

The new study led by Ursula Stockhorst, PhD, at the University of Osnabrück, Germany, specifically shows that peripheral and brain markers of fear recall differ in a hormone-dependent manner between men and women.

The work appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

Cameron Carter, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, said of the work: "This study sheds light on the well-known differences between men and women in their vulnerability to anxiety disorders and shows that aspects of fear learning and extinction that contribute to vulnerability in women are related to differences in estrogen levels."

For the study, first author and PhD student Philipp Bierwirth, MSc, and colleagues examined 20 men, 20 women using oral hormonal contraceptives (OC) and 20 free-cycling women during their mid-cycle (MC). Women taking OC have suppressed and thus low endogenous E2 levels, whereas free-cycling MC women have higher levels of E2.

Participants underwent a fear-conditioning paradigm in which two of four photographs of neutral male faces were paired with a loud burst of white noise. Following the conditioning, the subjects underwent fear extinction, in which two photographs - only one of which had been paired with the noise - were again presented, but this time with no noise stimulus. The next day, subjects were shown all four photographs again, including the two that had been presented in the extinction phase and thus ready for extinction recall, and two of them without previous extinction - thus subject to fear recall. During all presentations, the researchers measured skin conductance responses (SCR), a peripheral readout of fear expression, and brain oscillations measured by electroencephalography.

Mr. Bierwirth said: "We found stronger peripheral fear expression (via SCR) during fear recall and extinction recall under low-E2 conditions, that is, in men and in OC women, compared to mid-cycle women with higher E2 levels. Most importantly, we also observed enhanced theta oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex and especially in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), in men and OC women compared to MC women."

Importantly, the authors also point out that subjects were examined during their natural E2 status. They were not randomized to experimentally manipulated estrogen levels and so causal inferences about estrogen cannot be drawn.

Fear recall-related dACC theta oscillations were attenuated in women with higher E2 levels, which, importantly, supports previous findings suggesting a protective role for E2 against fear overexpression during the recall of fear and extinction memories. The data demonstrate that peripheral and brain oscillatory correlates of fear memory recall do not differ between the sexes per se but vary with E2 status, even among women.

###

Notes for editors

The article is "Prefrontal theta oscillations are modulated by estradiol-status during fear recall and extinction recall," by Philipp Bierwirth, Matthias Sperl, Martin Antov, Ursula Stockhorst (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2021.02.011). It appears as an Article in Press in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

Copies of this paper are available to credentialed journalists upon request; please contact Rhiannon Bugno at BPCNNI@sobp.org or +1 254 522 9700. Journalists wishing to interview the authors may contact Philipp Bierwirth at pbierwirth@uni-osnabrueck.de or +49 541 969-4275.

The authors' affiliations and disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available in the article.

Cameron S. Carter, MD, is Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology and Director of the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis. His disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available here.

About Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging

Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging is an official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, whose purpose is to promote excellence in scientific research and education in fields that investigate the nature, causes, mechanisms and treatments of disorders of thought, emotion, or behavior. In accord with this mission, this peer-reviewed, rapid-publication, international journal focuses on studies using the tools and constructs of cognitive neuroscience, including the full range of non-invasive neuroimaging and human extra- and intracranial physiological recording methodologies. It publishes both basic and clinical studies, including those that incorporate genetic data, pharmacological challenges, and computational modeling approaches. The 2019 Impact Factor score for Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging is 5.335. http://www.sobp.org/bpcnni

About Elsevier

As a global leader in information and analytics, Elsevier helps researchers and healthcare professionals advance science and improve health outcomes for the benefit of society. We do this by facilitating insights and critical decision-making for customers across the global research and health ecosystems.

In everything we publish, we uphold the highest standards of quality and integrity. We bring that same rigor to our information analytics solutions for researchers, health professionals, institutions and funders.

Elsevier employs 8,100 people worldwide. We have supported the work of our research and health partners for more than 140 years. Growing from our roots in publishing, we offer knowledge and valuable analytics that help our users make breakthroughs and drive societal progress. Digital solutions such as ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciVal, ClinicalKey and Sherpath support strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and health education. Researchers and healthcare professionals rely on our 2,500+ digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, our 40,000 eBook titles; and our iconic reference works, such as Gray's Anatomy. With the Elsevier Foundation and our external Inclusion & Diversity Advisory Board, we work in partnership with diverse stakeholders to advance inclusion and diversity in science, research and healthcare in developing countries and around the world.

Elsevier is part of RELX, a global provider of information-based analytics and decision tools for professional and business customers. http://www.elsevier.com

Media contact

Rhiannon Bugno, Editorial Office
Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
+1 254 522 9700
BPCNNI@sobp.org

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.